Providing Resources & Support During COVID-19

Latest News

Regional Coalition Of Northeast Governors Announce Colleges Will Be Encouraged To Provide Testing For Students Before Leaving For Thanksgiving Break, Recommend Expanded Remote Instruction To End Fall Semester Safely

Harrisburg, PA - Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf, New York Governor Andrew M. Cuomo, New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy, Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont, Delaware Governor John Carney, Rhode Island Governor Gina Raimondo and Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker today...

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Wolf Administration Provides Testing and Contact Tracing Update

Michael Huff, Director of Testing and Contact Tracing for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, presented an update on the commonwealth’s COVID-19 testing and contact tracing efforts, including Pennsylvania’s plans to distribute more than 3.8 million Abbott BinaxNOW...

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Federal Stimulus Package – ‘Putting Workers First’

A bipartisan, robust third COVID-19 bill that will immediately bolster our health care response and our economy.

Unemployment Insurance: ($260 billion)

A massive investment in the UI program as well as critical reforms to make the program more effective for workers. In the wake of the economic recession caused by the coronavirus the UI program is an essential a long-term lifeline for millions of workers during this crisis.

  • Full Paycheck Replacement: $600 increase for every American, which equates to 100 percent of wages for the average American without a paycheck struggling through the Crisis
  • Waiving Waiting Weeks: Gets money in people’s pockets sooner by providing federal incentives for states to eliminate waiting weeks.
  • Extension of Benefits: An additional 13 weeks of federally-funded unemployment insurance benefits are immediately be made available.
  • Expanding Access: Allow part-time, self-employed, and gig economy workers to access UI benefits.

Marshall Plan For Our Health System ($150 billion)

An unprecedented and historic investment for our health care system in its fight against the COVID-19 pandemic. The new $150 billion fund is widely available to all types of hospitals and providers most affected by COVID-19, and it will be available to fund whatever is needed to defeat this virus.

This includes:

  • Equipment and Infrastructure: Personal and protective equipment for health care workers, testing supplies, increased workforce and training, new construction to house patients, emergency operation centers and more.
  • Enhanced Health Investments: Additional funding is also dedicated to delivering Medicare payment increases to all hospitals and providers to ensure that they receive the funding they need during this crisis, and new investments in our country’s Strategic National Stockpile, surge capacity and medical research into COVID-19.

Robust Worker and Transparency Protections on Government Loans

  • No stock buybacks or dividends for the length of any loan provided by the Treasury plus 1 year.
  • Restrictions on any increases to executive compensation.
  • Protect collective bargaining agreements.
  • Real-time public reporting of Treasury transactions under the Act, including terms of loans, investments or other assistance to corporations.
  • Prohibition on businesses controlled by the President, Vice President, Members of Congress, and heads of Executive Departments getting loans or investments from Treasury programs.
  • Creation of Treasury Department Special Inspector General for Pandemic Recovery to provide oversight of Treasury loans and investments and a Pandemic Response Accountability Committee to protect taxpayer dollars. • Creation of a Congressional Oversight Commission to enhance legislative oversight of pandemic response.

 

Small Business Rescue Plan ($377 billion)

  • $350 billion in loan forgiveness grants to small businesses and non-profits to maintain existing workforce and help pay for other expenses like rent, mortgage, and utilities.
  • $10 billion for SBA emergency grants of up to $10,000 to provide immediate relief for small business operating costs. • $17 billion for SBA to cover 6 months of payments for small businesses with existing SBA loans.


Protected Over 2 Million Aviation Industry Jobs

  • Democrats secured direct payroll payments to keep millions of airline workers on the job and receiving paychecks.
  • Airline companies will be prohibited from stock buybacks and dividends for the entire life of the grant plus one year.
  • Collective Bargaining Agreements negotiated by workers will be protected.


Increased Direct Payments to Working Americans

  • Democrats fought to double cash payments to the working class Americans from $600 to $1,200
  • An additional $500 cash payment is available per child.
  • The full payment is available for individuals making up to $75,000 (individual) and $150,000 (married).
  • The value begins decreasing and then phases out completely for those making over the full payment income cap.

State and Local Coronavirus Expenditures Fund ($150 billion)

To assist States, Tribes, and local governments that must pay for new expenses related to COVID-19 response.

  • $150 billion, with a small-state minimum of $1.25 billion
  • Tribal set-aside of $8 billion

Emergency Appropriations ($330 billion, including $100 billion for hospitals and providers mentioned above)

  • $16 billion to replenish the Strategic National Stockpile supplies of pharmaceuticals, personal protective equipment, and other medical supplies, which are distributed to State and local health agencies, hospitals and other healthcare entities facing shortages during emergencies.
  • $1 billion for the Defense Production Act to bolster domestic supply chains, enabling industry to quickly ramp up production of personal protective equipment, ventilators, and other urgently needed medical supplies, and billions dollars more for federal, state, and local health agencies to purchase such equipment.
  • $4.3 billion to support federal, state, and local public health agencies to prevent, prepare for, and respond to the coronavirus, including for the purchase of personal protective equipment; laboratory testing to detect positive cases; infection control and mitigation at the local level to prevent the spread of the virus; and other public health preparedness and response activities.
  • $45 billion for FEMA’s Disaster Relief Fund, more than doubling the available funding, to provide for the immediate needs of state, local, tribal, and territorial governments, as well as private non-profits performing critical and essential services, to protect citizens and help them recover from the overwhelming effects of COVID-19. Reimbursable activities may include medical response, personal protective equipment, National Guard deployment, coordination of logistics, safety measures, and community services nationwide.
  • $30.75 billion for grants to provide emergency support to local school systems and higher education institutions to continue to provide educational services to their students and support the on-going functionality of school districts and institutions.
  • $25 billion in aid to our nation’s transit systems to help protect public health and safety while ensuring access to jobs, medical treatment, food, and other essential services.
  • $10 billion in grants to help our nation’s airports as the aviation sector grapples with the most steep and potentially sustained decline in air travel in history.
  • $3.5 billion in additional funding for the Child Care Development Block Grant to provide child care assistance to health care sector employees, emergency responders, sanitation workers, and other workers deemed essential during the response to the coronavirus.
  • More than $7 billion for affordable housing and homelessness assistance programs. This funding will help low-income and working class Americans avoid evictions and minimize any impacts caused by loss of employment, and child care, or other unforeseen circumstances related to COVID-19, and support additional assistance to prevent eviction and for people experiencing homelessness
  • More than $6.5 billion in Federal funding for CDBG, the Economic Development Administration, and the Manufacturing Extension Partnership to help mitigate the local economic crisis and rebuild impacted industries such as tourism or manufacturing supply chains.
  • $400 million in election assistance for the states to help prepare for the 2020 election cycle, including to increase the ability to vote by mail, expand early voting and online registration, and increase the safety of voting in-person by providing additional voting facilities and more pollworkers. • $2 billion in funding to strengthen response capacity and support tribal governments: o $1.03 billion to the Indian Health Service to support tribal health care system response efforts; o $100 million more for the USDA Food Distribution Program for Indian Reservations; o $453 million to assist tribes through the Bureau of Indian Affairs; o $69 million to help tribal schools, colleges and universities through for the Bureau of Indian Education; and o $300 million more to the HUD Indian Tribal Block Grant program. • $1 billion to recapitalize Amtrak after steep ridership declines related to the outbreak. This will keep thousands of Amtrak employees employed, and ensure America’s intercity passenger rail stays on track, continuing service in the Northeast and nationwide.

Student Loan Relief

  • To alleviate the pressure of student loan costs during this crisis, Senate Democrats fought for the inclusion of tax relief encouraging employers to implement student loan repayment programs. This provision will exclude up to $5,250 in qualifying student loan repayments paid by the employer on behalf of the employee from income for income tax purposes.

Some helpful links to understand the Federal Stimulus Package:

Status of your stimulus check

Most Americans can expect to start seeing their stimulus checks from the coronavirus relief bill in about three weeks, according to Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin.

Singles who have adjusted gross income of less than $75,000 would get $1,200 and married couples who file taxes jointly and earn less than $150,000 would get $2,400. Singles who earn less than $99,000 and married couples who earn less than $198,000 would get a partial benefit.

The checks will be sent based your 2019 or 2018 adjusted gross income on your tax return. If you haven’t filed a tax return, you should file a tax return quickly if you can. The IRS will also access information from Social Security to send the payments.

But what if the IRS can’t track you down to send you a stimulus check?

All is not lost. Just delayed.

If you don’t receive your check, you’ll see the benefit as a tax refund when you file your return in 2020.

That’s because the funds from the stimulus check are actually an advance on a credit you will be able to take on your 2020 tax return.

So while the funds are meant to give relief now, if you don’t get it, you can still take the credit on your 2020 return and you’d get the stimulus amount in the form of a tax refund, said Garrett Watson, senior policy analyst for The Tax Foundation..

Still not sure if you qualify? Use the stimulus check calculator to see what benefit you can expect.

(Source:  https://www.nj.com/coronavirus/2020/03/heres-what-you-need-to-know-if-your-stimulus-check-doesnt-arrive.html)

 Some helpful links to understand the Federal Stimulus Package:

Families First Coronavirus Response Act

The Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) provided for the expansion of Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA). This is a federal program administered by the US Department of Labor.

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division (WHD) published its first round of implementation guidance pursuant to the FFCRA yesterday.

The following was provided to us as guidance by the USDOL and has been posted on our website.  The  information can be found at: https://www.uc.pa.gov/COVID-19/Pages/FFCRA.aspx

The Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA or Act) requires certain employers to provide their employees with expanded family and medical leave for specified reasons related to COVID-19.  The United States Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division administers and enforces the new law’s paid leave requirements. These provisions will apply from April 1, 2020 through December 31, 2020.  Please read the below fact sheets to determine if you are eligible.

COVID-19 Loan Programs Quick Guide

The information provided is not comprehensive of each program or of all programs. At the time of publication it is the most accurate and up-to-date information available. Information and programs are subject to change. (March 27, 2020)

Paycheck Protection Program (CARES Bill)

This program incentivizes small businesses to keep employees on payroll by offering extensive debt relief for small employers, self-employed individuals, and “gig economy” workers. With $350 billion to help prevent workers from losing their jobs and small businesses from going under due to economic losses caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, the “Paycheck Protection Program” would provide 8 weeks of cashflow assistance through 100% federally guaranteed loans to small employers who maintain their payroll during this emergency.

NOTE Program Details are still being finalized. Borrower cannot claim same loss using multiple programs.

ELIGIBILITY Small businesses, 501(c)(3)’s, 501(c) (19)’s, and 31(b)(2)(c), under 500 employees, including independent contractors, sole proprietors, and the self-employed. Entities must have been operational by 2/15/20, had payroll and paid taxes.

FUNDING Maximum amount via 7(a) set to $10,000,000.

TERMS Covered loan period is 2/25/20–6/30/20. Portion not forgiven or repaid by 12/31/20 will convert to a max 10 year loan at up to max interest rate; loan will remain 100% guaranteed.

  1. Eligible expenses include payroll, insurance, rent, mortgage and utilities.
  2. Defers payments on PPP loan for 6-12 months. No prepayment fees.
  3. Waives borrower and lender fees, credit elsewhere requirements, and collateral and personal guarantee.

INTEREST Maximum interest rate is 4%.

TO APPLY https://www.sba.gov/funding-programs/loans/paycheck-protection-program-ppp

Emergency Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL)

The U.S. Small Business Administration is offering states and territories low-interest federal disaster loans for working capital to small businesses suffering substantial economic injury as a result of the Coronavirus (COVID-19).

NOTE Entities eligible to apply for EIDL may request an advance in the form of an emergency grant of up to $10,000 which SBA must distribute within 3 days. Applicants are not required to repay emergency grant if they are ultimately denied EIDL.

ELIGIBILITY Expanded to include sole proprietors, tribal businesses, cooperatives, ESOP’s, individual contractors, and private non-profits with fewer than 500 employees.

FUNDING The maximum loan amount is 2,000,000.

TERMS Max 30 year (determined on case-by-case basis)

  1. May be used to pay fixed debts, payroll, accounts payable and other bills impacted by disaster.
  2. Defers payments on PPP loan for 6-12 months. No prepayment fees.
  3. For loans/advances under $200,000, waives credit elsewhere, personal guarantee, and 1-year-inbusiness requirements.

INTEREST Small businesses: 3.75%; non-profits: 2.75%.

TO APPLY https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela/

Small Business Loan

The Federal Small Business Administration (SBA) and the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development (DCED) are working to provide Disaster Assistance Loans for Small Businesses Impacted by Coronavirus (COVID-19).

Small Business Disaster Loan Assistance (SBA)

The U.S. Small Business Administration, in addition to local funding partners, may also be a source of assistance for affected businesses with funding opportunities up to $2 million. Learn more on how to apply here.

The Small Business Administration has just opened their applications for Disaster Loan Assistance. Small businesses can apply at https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela/.

SBA disaster loans offer an affordable way for individuals and businesses to recover from declared disasters. The interest rate is 3.75% for small businesses without credit available elsewhere; businesses with credit available elsewhere are not eligible. The interest rate for non-profits is 2.75%.  As a small business, small agricultural cooperative, small business engaged in aquaculture, or private non-profit organization you may borrow up to $2 million for Economic Injury. Applicants may also call SBA’s Customer Service Center at (800) 659-2955 or email disastercustomerservice@sba.gov for more information on SBA disaster assistance.

For questions, please call SBA Call 1-800-659-2955 (TTY: 1-800-877-8339) or e-mail disastercustomerservice@sba.gov (link sends e-mail).

Essential Agriculture Businesses

The PA Department of Agriculture has developed the following guidelines and recommendations for essential agricultural businesses to help ensure a safe and accessible food supply during the COVID-19 mitigation efforts:

About the Coronavirus

What is coronavirus?

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses, some causing illness in people and others circulating among animals, including camels, cats and bats.

The 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) is a new virus that causes respiratory illness in people and can spread from person-to-person. This virus was first identified during an investigation into an outbreak in Wuhan, China.

What are the symptoms of coronavirus?

Symptoms of the COVID-19 can include:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath

The symptoms may appear in as few as two days or as long as 14 days after exposure. Reported illnesses have ranged from people with little to no symptoms to people being severely ill and dying.

How can the Coronavirus spread?

Human coronaviruses spread just like the flu or a cold:

  • Through the air by coughing or sneezing;
  • Close personal contact, such as touching or shaking hands;
  • Touching an object or surface with the virus on it;
  • Occasionally, fecal contamination.

How can I help protect myself?

Prevention:

  • Cover coughs or sneezes with your elbow. Do not use your hands!
  • Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.
  • Clean surfaces frequently, including countertops, light switches, cell phones, remotes, and other frequently touched items.
  • Contain: if you are sick, stay home until you are feeling better.

In addition, it is recommended that Pennsylvanians take time to prepare now. View the PA Emergency Preparedness Guide.

 

Most Philadelphia Workers are Entitled to Sick Leave!

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  • Community Legal ServicesIf you work at a job with 10 or more workers, you must get paid sick leave. Jobs with 9 or fewer workers must give leave but it can be unpaid.
  • Full time and part time workers are covered, as long as you work 40 hours per year in Philly.
  • You can start using sick time after 90 days on the job and can earn 40 hours per year; one hour for each 40 hours you work.
  • Gig workers, independent contractors, union members, seasonal workers and state and federal government workers are not covered by this law
  • You are protected from retaliation for taking sick time or asking to take it.

Learn More

Unemployment Compensation

If your job has been affected by COVID-19, you may be eligible to receive unemployment compensation benefits. You can apply online to get started.

Please note that the waiting week has been suspended. Eligible claimants may receive benefits for the first week that they are unemployed. Previously, claimants were not eligible for benefits during their first week of unemployment.

Work search and work registration requirements have been temporarily waived for all claimants. Claimants are not required to prove they have applied or searched for a new job to maintain UC benefits. Claimants are also not required to register with PA Career Link.

Pandemic Unemployment Assistance

Pandemic Unemployment Assistance Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) provides payment to workers not traditionally eligible for unemployment benefits (self-employed, independent contractors, workers with limited work history, and others) who are unable to work as a direct result of the coronavirus public health emergency.

Covered:

  • Diagnosed with COVID-19 or with COVID-19 symptoms and seeking diagnosis
  • Member of household has been diagnosed with COVID-19
  • Providing care for family or household member diagnosed with COVID-19
  • Primary caregiver for child unable to attend school or another facility closed due to COVID-19
  • Unable to reach place of employment due to an imposed quarantine or because advised by medical provider to self-quarantine due to COVID-19
  • Scheduled to commence new employment and cannot reach workplace as direct result of COVID-19
  • Became major breadwinner because head of household died from COVID-19
  • Quit job as a direct result of COVID-19
  • Place of employment closed as a direct result of COVID-19
  • Self-employed / Independent Contractors / 1099 filers / Farmers – and affected by COVID-19
  • Seeking part-time employment but affected by COVID-19
  • With insufficient work history and affected by COVID-19
  • Otherwise not qualified for regular or extended UI benefits and affected by COVID-19

Not Covered:

  • Individuals that can telework with pay
  • Individual receiving paid sick leave or other paid leave benefits (regardless of meeting a category listed above)

Important Links:

Federal CARES Act

On Friday, Governor Wolf announced that the Pennsylvania Department of Labor & Industry is implementing new federal unemployment compensation benefits provided by the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. The COVID-19 relief package temporarily provides an additional $600 per week, makes self-employed, independent contractors and gig workers eligible for benefits and extends unemployment compensation (UC) benefits for an additional 13 weeks. The federal benefits are in addition to Pennsylvania’s regular unemployment benefit, which is about half of a person’s full-time weekly income up to $572 per week for 26 weeks.

Federal CARES ActAs part of the CARES Act, unemployment benefits are being expanded to provide an additional $600 per week beginning the week ending April 4, 2020, through the week ending July 25, 2020. This temporary emergency increase in benefits is referred to as the Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation (FPUC) program.

On Friday, Labor & Industry issued the first $600 payments. All eligible claimants that filed biweekly claims for the week ending April 4 and who received their regular UC payment should expect to see the additional money either today or Wednesday. For other eligible claimants who have not yet received a regular UC payment, they will receive the extra $600 the week after receiving their first UC payment.

It is very important to note that anyone who currently has federal withholding tax taken out of their benefits will see the same 10% reduction in the FPUC payment, resulting in a $540 payment. For information about changing your withholding election, visit L&I’s Taxes on Benefits page.
The $600 is paid separately from the biweekly UC benefit, and residents do not need to apply.
Visit the department’s FPUC frequently asked questions for more information.

The CARES Act also temporarily makes unemployment compensation available to self-employed, independent contractors, gig economy workers, and others not normally eligible for the benefit. The program is referred to as Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA). These workers cannot apply through the department’s UC online system at this time. The U.S. Department of Labor requires that PUA be tracked separately from regular UC. For this reason, Pennsylvania must build a new online platform to process PUA benefits.

Eligible individuals should be able to start applying for PUA benefits within the next two weeks. Eligible claimants will receive backdated payments to January 27, 2020, or the first week they were unable to work due to COVID-19, whichever of the two dates is later. The PUA benefit will end December 31, 2020. The department will announce when the PUA benefit application is available. Please visit L&I’s PUA frequently asked questions for more information.

The CARES Act provides an additional 13 weeks of unemployment compensation, including for workers who exhaust their regular unemployment benefits. Claimants will be eligible for Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) from the week beginning March 29, 2020, through the end of the year. The department is awaiting additional federal guidance about the program and will provide an update when information is available.

Additional Information for workers impacted by COVID-19:

Mitigation efforts related to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) in Pennsylvania have required everyone to work within rapidly changing, complex circumstances which create a variety of unique situations and conditions for workers, businesses, employers and communities. The Pennsylvania Department of Labor & Industry is committed to providing workers and business communities with ongoing guidance, resources, and information. This page is updated regularly.

Use our Keep Yourself Safe at Work During a COVID-19 Pandemic one-pager for safety information and resources.

Workers impacted by COVID-19 can also visit our Information for Pennsylvania Employees Impacted by COVID-19 page for the latest updates.

COVID-19 Guide: Scenarios & Benefits Available Chart (PDF)

Food Resources

Philadelphia Corporation for Aging Sponsored Senior Centers/Satellites

Grab and Go meals, Home Delivered Meal Coordination or Commodities Box Access

North Central Philadelphia

CHCS Norris Square Center
2121 N. Howard St, 19122
215-423-7241
*Spanish-Speaking*

Nativity Satellite Program
(Formerly St. Anne’s)
3255 Belgrade St., 19134
215-423-2772

King Older Adult Center
2100 W. Cecil B. Moore Ave., 19121
215-685-2715
Mondays and Wednesdays

Lutheran Settlement House
1340 Frankford Ave., 19125
215-426-8610
Food Pantry On Site

Mann Older Adult Center
3201 N. 5th St., 19140
215-685-9844
*Spanish-Speaking*
Mondays and Wednesdays

Northern Living Center
827 N Franklin Street, 19123
215-978-1300

On Lok House Satellite
219 N. 10th St., 19107
215-599-3016
*Asian Languages*
Mondays Only

PSC – Allegheny Branch
1900 W. Allegheny Ave., 19132
267-286-1455
Mondays and Thursdays

Northwest Philadelphia

Center in the Park
5818 Germantown Ave., 19144
215-848-7722

The Center at Journey’s Way
403 Rector St., 19128
215-487-1750
Mondays Only

Northeast Philadelphia

Northeast Older Adult Center
8101 Bustleton Ave., 19152
215-685-0576
Mondays and Wednesdays

Peter Bressi NE Senior Center
4744-46 Frankford Ave., 19124
215-831-2926

Kleinlife Northeast &
Kleinlife Russian Satellite
10100 Jamison Ave., 19116
215-698-7300
*Some Korean-Speaking*
Tuesdays Only

Juniata Park Older Adult Center
1251 E Sedgley Avenue, 19134
215-685-1490
Mondays and Wednesdays

West Philadelphia

Firehouse Active Adult Center
5331 Haverford Ave., 19139
215-472-6188

West Philadelphia Senior Community Center
1016-26 N. 41st St., 19104
215-386-0379

South Philadelphia

St. Edmonds Senior Community Center CHCS (Formerly St. Charles)
2130 S 21st St, 19145 
215-790-9530

Marconi Older Adult Program
2433 S. 15th St., 19145
215-218-0800

PSC-Avenue of the Arts and Asian- Pacific Senior Resource Center
509 S. Broad St., 19147
215-546-5879
Mondays and Thursdays

Southwest Philadelphia

CHCS Star Harbor Sr. Center Satellite
4700 Springfield Ave., 19143
215-726-7468

Southwest Senior Center
6916 Elmwood Ave., 19142
215-937-1880

Wolf Administration Directs Families to Emergency Food Assistance During COVID-19 Mitigation

March 17, 2020

Harrisburg, PA – Today, Agriculture Secretary Russell Redding issued guidance for accessing emergency food assistance for Pennsylvanians at risk of hunger due to measures to slow the spread of COVID-19.

“During this time of major precautions to reduce risks of spreading COVID-19, those out of work, those who rely on college meal plans, school meals to feed their children, and those who are isolated may not know where to turn for food,” Secretary Redding said. “No Pennsylvanian should go hungry, even in these extraordinary times.”

Redding offered these specific instructions for those seeking emergency food assistance.

Who is eligible to get food from a food bank or food pantry?

If you are out of work without pay, you are eligible to receive food sourced from the state and federal government from a food bank or food pantry in Pennsylvania. This includes service workers who are unable to get shifts or hourly wage employees of non-essential businesses that have voluntarily closed due to COVID-19 mitigation. You will be asked to verbally complete a Self-Declaration of Need form, as signatures have been temporarily waived due to COVID-19. (Forms are also available in Spanish and Russian.) You will be asked to provide your household size and weekly income level as of the day you apply. Complete income guidelines can be found at agriculture.pa.gov.

Will food banks be open?

Food banks are open and delivering food to many agencies, including pantries, shelters, and soup kitchens. Please call or visit the website of your regional food bank to be directed to agencies in your community.  Many food banks are also doing special drive-through distributions. Please call for more information.

Where can I find a food bank or food pantry near me?

Contact the following Feeding Pennsylvania and Hunger-Free Pennsylvania member food banks to find out about food assistance services being offered in your county.

Alliance for Nonprofit Resources Inc. (serving Butler County)

Bucks County Opportunity Council Inc. (serving Bucks County)

Central Pennsylvania Food Bank (serving Adams, Bedford, Blair, Bradford, Centre, Clearfield, Clinton, Columbia, Cumberland, Dauphin, Franklin, Fulton, Huntingdon, Juniata, Lancaster, Lebanon, Lycoming, Mifflin, Montour, Northumberland, Perry Potter, Snyder, Sullivan, Tioga, Union and York counties)

Chester County Food Bank (serving Chester County)

Community Food Warehouse of Mercer County  (serving Mercer County)

Fayette County Community Action Food Bank (serving Fayette County

Food for Families (serving Cambria County)

Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank (serving Allegheny, Armstrong, Beaver, Butler, Cambria, Fayette, Greene, Indiana, Lawrence, Somerset and Washington counties)

Greater Washington County Food Bank (serving Washington County)

Helping Harvest (serving Berks and Schuylkill counties)

Indiana County Community Action Program  (serving Indiana County)

Philabundance (serving Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery and Philadelphia counties)

Second Harvest Food Bank of the Lehigh Valley and Northeast Pennsylvania (serving Carbon, Lehigh, Monroe, Northampton, Pike and Wayne counties)

Second Harvest Food Bank of Northwest Pennsylvania (serving Cameron, Clarion, Clearfield, Crawford, Elk, Erie, Forest, Jefferson, McKean, Venango and Warren counties)

Share Food Program (serving Montgomery and Philadelphia Counties)

Weinberg Northeast Regional Food Bank (serving Lackawanna, Luzerne, Susquehanna and Wyoming counties)

Westmoreland County Food Bank  (serving Westmoreland County)

York County Food Bank (serving York County)

How do I get food from a food bank if I can’t leave my house because I am under isolation or quarantine?

If you or a family member is under isolation or quarantine, contact your local food bank to see if they have options to deliver food. If you are concerned about potential exposure, there are steps you and food banks can take to limit risk. The PA Department of Agriculture sent guidance to all food banks encouraging them to follow best practices to limit risk of exposure.

What do I do if my local food pantry is closed?

You can go to another food pantry in your area, using the links above. We recommend checking with your local food bank to ensure other local food pantries are open.

How will students access meals while schools are closed?

The Pennsylvania Department of Education offers information on accessing meals on its website.

For information as it relates to agriculture during COVID-19 mitigation in Pennsylvania visit agriculture.pa.gov/COVID. For the most accurate, timely information related to Health in Pennsylvania, visit on.pa.gov/coronavirus.

MEDIA CONTACT: Shannon Powers – 717.603.2056

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How you can get tested for coronavirus in Philadelphia and Montgomery County

Philadelphia, Montgomery County and the immediate region remain the epicenter for the coronavirus outbreak in Pennsylvania. The Pennsylvania Department of Health is reporting 71 cases in Montgomery County, 69 in Philadelphia, 33 in Delaware County, 24 in Bucks County, and 19 in Chester County.

As such, public health officials like Pennsylvania Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel Levine is cautioning against interactions that would lead to community spread. A second person has died and Dr. Levine is reminding people to follow recommended practices and to stay home to prevent unintentional spread of this deadly disease.

 

 

To help prevent overextending our existing health infrastructure, officials urge people to self-assess whether they are sick and be mindful that there are a limited amount of coronavirus tests and resources available at this time. Follow the link to a fact sheet to learn more about testing.

If you are experiencing symptoms and in need of testing here are organizations providing coronavirus COVID-19 tests in the Philadelphia region:

Drive through testing is available at:

Read more: CDC recommendations on getting tested for coronavirus

Here is guide issued by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, helping provide clear guidance and direction in response to coronavirus COVID-19.

Keep in mind, Philadelphia is regularly updating its website to provide more information and resources on coronavirus COVID-19.